Ԫ The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Halifax Centre

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Dedicated to the Advancement of Astronomy and Allied Sciences

The Halifax Centre of the RASC is an active association of over 200 amateur and professional astronomers, united by their appreciation of the night sky and the wonders it contains. The Centre is located in the provincial capital city of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, but many members live in several outlying communities, other provinces, and even other countries. The roots of the Centre date back to 1951 when, with the help of Father Burke-Gaffney of St. Mary's University, the Nova Scotia Astronomical Society was founded. The NSAS became the Halifax Centre of the RASC in January 1955. The RASC prides itself in educating the general public about astronomy. The public programs sponsored by Halifax Centre include: lectures, public star nights, and activities during special astronomical events.

All photos and drawings on this site were created by RASC Halifax members, who reserve all rights.


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Monthly RASC meetings open to everyone!

RASC Events

RASC September Meeting

Friday, September 16th 2016

7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Main Presentation:

A Matter of Some Gravity by Dr. Roy Bishop

One hundred years ago, Albert Einstein presented his General Theory of Relativity (GTR), a description of gravitation that replaced Newton's theory of 1687. The GTR is the foundation of modern cosmology, the study of the nature and structure of the Universe. Besides giving a revolutionary insight into the nature of gravity, and being essential for GPS navigation, the GTR predicts the existence of gravitational waves. Almost 40 years ago indirect evidence for gravitational waves was found in the orbital decay of a binary pulsar. About the same time, apparatus to possibly detect gravitational waves directly began to be built. These detectors have become increasingly more sensitive as designs and technology have advanced. Success occurred late last summer. After traveling for more than a billion years, on 2015 September 14 at 06:50:45 ADT a burst of gravitational waves passed through Earth. You did not feel them but two detectors in the USA did, opening a new branch of astronomy. That discovery was announced this year, on February 11. As the Canadian reporter Ivan Semeniuk put it: "After countless generations of living in silence on the shores of a vast and restless cosmic ocean, the human species can finally hear the surf."

As in the past, we will be treated to a number of recent images our members have taken, as well as announcements.

Following the meeting will refreshments and social time.

Room AT101, Atrium Building, St. Mary's University(Map)

Dates of future meetings are:

Friday, October 21, 2016

Friday, Novembr 18, 2016

Friday, December 9, 2016

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Astronomy Nova Scotia

Quick Info

Read the Welcome Guide to Astronomy. (pdf)

What's Up? tonight.

Check out our Observing Aids, including the Clear Sky Clock, a sky map, and observing lists.

Visit our new Responsible Lighting page.

Find out more about The Halifax Centre.

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